05/24/12

Pork Wellington with Apple Sage Sauce and Apple Arugula Salad

Okay, this recipe is pretty fancy…but it’s not difficult. If you want a delicious, classy, recipe that is sure to wow the table…this is the one!

Pork Wellington

Recipe and photos by Chef Terry D. Ramsey

Yield: 4 servings Active Time: 30 min. Total Time: 2 hr. (includes resting)


  • 1 (12 to 16oz.) pork tenderloin
  • 4 oz. Boursin cheese (deli section)
  • 6 oz. prosciutto
  • 1 sheet puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 egg
  • 2 tbsp. water

1 to 24 Hours Before Serving: Trim the tenderloin of excess fat and “silver skin” (connective tissue on the surface) and the thin tail at the end (save for another use).

“Butterfly” the tenderloin for stuffing–cut a 1-inch deep incision down the length of each tenderloin – do not cut all the way through. Stuff the cheese into the incision.

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Roll the stuffed tenderloin with the prosciutto by laying the prosciutto slices in a single layer, overlapping them slightly.

Place the stuffed tenderloin at the base of the overlapping prosciutto and roll to cover.

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is heated, sear the wrapped tenderloin until the prosciutto is brown and crisp on all sides–about 5 to 8 minutes.

Remove from pan and chill thoroughly.

Wrap the tenderloin in 2/3 of a sheet of puff pastry (the sheets are usually folded into thirds, simply unfold a sheet and trim-off), cover and chill 1/3 sheet to use for decorations later.

Roll-out the remaining 2/3 sheet until it is large enough to wrap the tenderloin.

Place the chilled tenderloin at the base of the long side of the sheet…

and roll to cover…

tucking in the ends to make a nice package.

Cover the wrapped tenderloin with cutouts and vines from the reserved, chilled 1/3 puff pastry. (Optional)

Place the egg and water in a small bowl and mix thoroughly with a fork to create an “egg wash.” Brush the wash over the decorated, wrapped tenderloin and then wrap in plastic-wrap and chill from 1 to 24 hours.

Baking: Preheat oven to 400 F with rack in lower third of the oven. Brush with more egg wash for good browning.

Bake the tenderloin 30-35 minutes or until golden. Note: these “Wellingtons” cook at a lower temperature and longer than Beef Wellingtons.

Remove the cooked tenderloin from the oven and let rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

Trim-off the ends as they will be doughy. Slice 2-inch sections, allowing 2-3 per person.

Serve with Apple-Sage Sauce

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Apple-Sage Sauce

Yield: 2 cup Active Time: 20 min. Total Time: 20 min.


  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 cup yellow onion, chopped
  • ½ cup carrot, chopped
  • ½ cup celery, chopped
  • 2 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 4 bay leaves
  • ½ cup apple juice
  • ½ dry white wine
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 4 tbsp. water
  • 4 tsp. cornstarch
  • 2 tbsp. apple jelly
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 4 tsp. fresh sage, minced

Sauté vegetables, tomato paste, and bay leaves in butter until soft, 5 minutes.

Deglaze the pan with apple juice and white wine, scraping up bits from bottom of the pan. Simmer until reduced, 5 minutes.

Add the beef broth; simmer 8-10 minutes, then strain. Note: sauce may be made ahead to this point and chilled.)

Return broth to a clean pan and bring to a boil over high heat.

Combine the cornstarch and water in a small bowl, smashing out lumps with your fingers. Whisk cornstarch into the boiling broth, stirring constantly until slightly thickened.

Finish with the jelly, butter and sage. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Deglazing is a cooking technique for removing and dissolving caramelized meat residue from a pan, typically with wine, to make a pan sauce. The resulting liquid can be seasoned and served on its own (a jus), or with the addition of onions or shallots, carrots and celery, or be used as the base for a soup. The sauce can also be thickened by whisking butter in, through the addition of a starch, such as flour, or simply simmered down with a steady heat to form a rich, concentrated reduction.

This method is the cornerstone of many well known sauces and gravies.

Apple-Arugula Salad with Cider Vinaigrette (1c)

Yield: 4 servings Active Time: 15 min. Total Time: 15 min.


Dressing

  • 4 tbsp. cider vinegar
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper, freshly ground

Salad

  • 2 bunches arugula
  • ½ lb. radishes
  • 1 red apple

Remove thick stems from arugula, rinse and dry. Thinly slice radishes on a mandoline or with vegetable peeler. Peel, core and finely dice the apple.

Whisk together vinegar, olive oil, shallot, salt and pepper. Toss arugula, radishes and red apple together. Toss salad with dressing right before serving.