12/14/12

Broiled Salmon, Thai Cucumber Basil Salad & Furikaki Rice

This was my favorite recipe from next week’s menu plan…so good I had to share!

Broiled Salmon with Furikaki Rice and Thai Cucumber Basil Salad

Broiled Salmon; Thai Cucumber Basil Salad; Furikaki Rice

Broiled Salmon with Thai Cucumber Basil Salad (7a)
Yield: 4 servings
Active Time: 25 min.
Total Time: 25 min.


Salad

  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 dash salt
  • 1 lg. English cucumber
  • 20 sprigs basil, leaves minced

Salmon

  • 4 salmon fillets (6 oz. each)
  • vegetable oil
  • salt & black pepper

Mise en Place

Seed and cut cucumber into 1/4-inch rounds. Combine garlic, lime juice, fish sauce, coriander, and sugar in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Season with salt and set aside. Combine cucumbers and basil in a large bowl and set aside in refrigerator.

Prepare the Dish

Preheat the broiler. Rub salmon fillets lightly with vegetable oil and season with salt and pepper.

Line a heavy rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spray the foil with nonstick spray. Arrange the salmon fillets on the baking sheet and sprinkle them with salt and pepper.

Broil until the fillets are just cooked through and golden brown, about 7 minutes, then transfer to a large plate, tent with foil, and allow to rest for five minutes.

Meanwhile, toss cucumber and basil with half of dressing. Remove the skin from the salmon if desired. Spoon salad on top, or on the side, and drizzle remaining dressing on and around salmon.

Serve immediately.

Furikaki Rice (7b)
Yield: 4 servings
Active Time: 5 min.
Total Time: 20 min.

Furikake is a dry Japanese condiment meant to be sprinkled on top of rice. It typically consists of a mixture of dried and ground fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, and salt. Outside Japan, furikake can be found in most Asian groceries (near the katsuobushi) or in the ethnic food aisle of some major supermarkets. You can find a great recipe for homemade furikake on one my favorite new blogs, foodie with family.


  • 1 cup chicken broth, low-salt
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 cup jasmine rice
  • 2 tsp. furikaki seasoning

In a saucepan, bring the broth, water, rice and seasoning to a simmer. Reduce heat low; cover with a kitchen towel, and steam for 15-20 minutes or until liquid is absorbed and rice is tender.

Fluff with a fork, and serve.

11/29/12

Oil & Vinegar Portland & Chili Chutney Wings

Chef Chris and I have found a new favorite hang-out that we wanted to share. There’s a small oil & vinegar shop tucked away in the Clackamas Town Center, that has everything our foodie hearts could have desire, and more…

Oil & Vinegar is a culinary importer that brings together a wide range of international food and cooking products.

The shop has a distinct Mediterranean flair, and the shelves are stuffed with a cornucopia of imported delights.

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11/18/12

Highway Robbery! (Or…how to make your own breadcrumbs this year.)

I may have actually said a bad word at the grocery store today. I couldn’t help it…I was so shocked, it just slipped out, when I saw this…


Four and a half bucks for 13 OUNCES of breadcrumbs…BREADCRUMBS!

Breadcrumbs are dried bread, people! It takes roughly a loaf of fresh bread to make 13oz of the dry stuff. And that’s a loaf of cheap white or “wheat” bread…you know, like this:

That’s right, people are paying and extra $3.50 a bag to avoid the inconvenience of tossin’ slices of bread into a warm oven for a few minutes!

Have we completely lost our freakin’ minds???

Here’s what you do:

  1. Preheat you oven to 300. Lay you bread in a single layer on on your oven racks (remove from oven before pre-heating). Bake 10-15 minutes just just browned. You don’t want them dark, just get some of the moisture out of ’em.
  2. Remove from oven and let cool completely.
  3. If you like the little squares, dice each slice in a 1-inch grid…but it’s not really necessary, you can just tear it into chunks. (Oh, and if you’re using these for a coating, instead of making stuffing, just toss the chunks into your food processor and give ’em a pulse.)
  4. Store bread crumbs in an airtight container or food storage bag for up to two weeks at room temperature or 2 months in the freezer.

Congratulations, all that sweat and toil just paid off…you have breadcrumbs!

Seriously though, you can have a lot of fun with making your own. Try stuffing a mustard-coated pork loin with a dressing made with dark Russian rye bread sometime…it’s lovely. My wife likes me to use a nice 12-18 grain whole-wheat bread for stuffing hens (can you imagine what these bozos would charge for THOSE breadcrumbs?)

(By the way, if you’re enjoying this article, you may want to subscribe to our free newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week.)

Oh, and if you’re concerned about not having that overly-saged “spice packet”, toss this mixture for each loaf’s worth of finished breadcrumbs.

  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed

Just think, with the money you saved on stuffing…you can make another pumpkin pie! Woo-Hoo!

Have a great Thanksgiving folks!

-Chef Perry

11/17/12

10 Thanksgiving Survival Tips

What we’re really talking about is a wonderful day set aside on the fourth Thursday of November when no one diets.

I mean, why else would they call it Thanksgiving? – Erma Bombeck



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Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays, but it’s no secret that (especially for us foodies) it can bring with it a lot of kitchen chaos and performance anxiety. So many dishes, so many people, and so many “cherished family traditions” that must be upheld it’s would be well-nigh impossible to make it through the day without at least SOME drama.

So, if we can’t avoid the chaos, let’s at least try to get a rope on it, huh?

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09/28/12

Suddenly Celiac

I remember the day as clearly as if it were yesterday, at 37 I was suddenly celiac.

What now? I asked my doctor, as she handed me a list of all the things I could no longer eat.

Later, as I stood there at the grocery store with my long list of “can’t haves” in hand, I felt overwhelming sense that I would never eat real food again begin to creep over me…but hey, I have a love affair with food…what was this but an opportunity to learn how to love something new?

Yes it’s Celiac, yes, it’s a lifelong condition for which there is one cure…a gluten free diet, but that doesn’t mean the end to yummy food!

Thus begin my journey down the great, and glorious, and sometimes downright hilarious road of gluten free cuisine! There are things I had to learn how to do differently, of course.

First lesson?  You can’t make an apple taste like an orange no matter how hard you try, and the same theory applies to gluten free recipes.

Once you accept this and stop trying to make the perfect French bread that taste just like regular French bread (but without any of the regular ingredients) then, and only then, can you embrace the joys of eating gluten free.

So my journey has led me here now, to a place where, as a certified holistic health coach, I can help others faced with the daunting task of completely changing their way of eating.

I’m looking forward to working with Hautemealz.com and creating their weekly gluten-free menu plans.

I believe in what hautemealz.com doing. I’ve been on the receiving end of “Mom, what’s for dinner?”… (without a clue for an answer) way more times than I would like to admit!

Our Gluten Free & Easy menus are designed to take the guess work out of planning and preparing GF meals. Relax while you shop for products and brands that I have personally researched and verified to be gluten free!

Ever have a question about a recipe or an ingredient…we’re here for you!

So, check out our menu plans, download a free week, and give it a try. With our better-than-money-back promise, what have you got to lose?

And I promise you, I promise you… there will be gluten free French bread here no matter how many attempts it takes me to get right!

I look forward to sharing many wonderful meals with you,

-Maryse

Maryse Blake, CHC

 “A recipe for every night of the month, a shopping list for every week of the month, all for just $5.00 a month! That’s hautemealz.com!”

08/10/12

The Crawdaddy Cookbook

The Crawdaddy Cookbook is a free gift from hautemealz.com to our friends in the Tualatin Chamber of Commerce, all the attendees of the Tualatin Crawfish Festival, and to all of our fellow lovers of crawdads everwhere!

Click on the cover to download the PDF eBook

Inside, you’ll find a Crawdad F.A.Q., prep, cooking and shelling suggestions, Nutrition information on crawfish, and a bunch of delicious crawdad recipes from right in our own backyard, and around the world. Recipes like…

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07/24/12

Introducing our new “haute & healthy” diabetic-friendly menu plan!

Diabetes is not the end of your life…nor is it the end of enjoying good food!

As a borderline-diabetic, with a long family history of the disease, I personally develop,  test, and follow the recipes for the haute & healthy menu.

Each recipe is designed to help maintain acceptable blood-sugar levels, encourage weight-loss (two key elements in diabetes management), and provide a delicious, nutritious, and sustainable eating lifestyle.

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07/24/12

Garam Masala Pork Chops with Mint Yogurt and Spiced Couscous

hautemealz.com friend and food blogger, Michelle, over at FoodPassionista  saw the photo of this dish on our Facebook page, and kindly asked us for the recipe.

As it was easily my favorite dish from last week (cooked in a campground, no less), I thought, “Why not?”

So, Michelle…and all you other awesome people…enjoy!

– Perry

PS – A few slices of salted and peppered zuke and yellow squash, flash-grilled alongside the pork chops, would be a tasty addition to this meal!

PPS – Just a reminder, you could be getting delicious, nutritious recipes, just like this one, for every night of the week…at less than the cost of a happy meal each month! Sign up here! – P

Garam-Marsala-Pork-Chop-Recipe

Dinner 6

Garam Masala Pork Chops with Mint Yogurt; Spiced Couscous

Garam Masala Pork Chops with Mint Yogurt (6a)

It’s worth seeking out garam masala if you can. This blend of spices is available at many large grocery stores, as well as Asian specialty stores. If you can’t find it, you can use curry powder instead.

Yield: 4 servings                 
Active Time: 10 min.  
Total Time: 8 hr. 10 min. (incl. marinating)


  • 4 6-oz. lean pork loin chops
  • 4 tbsp. garam masala spices*
  • 1/2 cup Greek style yogurt
  • 10 fresh mint leaves

Trim pork chops of excess fat. Rub garam masala into chops (both sides).

Place on a plate, cover and refrigerate for 6-8 hours, to allow flavors to penetrate.

Chop the mint and stir into the yogurt and refrigerate for the same period as the pork chops.

Preheat broiler. Spray broiler rack with nonstick cooking spray. Broil chops for about 5 minutes each side. Alternately, grill chops over direct heat until well marked on both sides, move to indirect heat, cover loosely in foil, and cook until internal temp reaches 145F. Remove from heat and allow to rest 3 minutes.

Serve with mint yogurt.

 Note: *Garam Masala is available in specialty stores and many larger grocery stores. You can use curry powder instead if you wish, or you could even make your own garam masala with this recipe.

 Spiced Couscous (6b)

Yield: 4 servings                  
Active Time: 10 min.  
Total Time: 15 min.


  • 1 1/3 cup chicken broth
  • 4 tsp. raisins
  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 2 pinches cayenne pepper (opt)
  • 2 pinches salt
  • 2/3 cup couscous
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tsp. sesame seeds

Nutritional facts for this meal

In a medium saucepan bring the broth, raisins, olive oil, cumin, cayenne and salt to a boil. Stir in the couscous, bring back to a boil, cover and remove from the heat. Set aside for 5 minutes.

Juice the lemon and stir into the couscous with the sesame seeds.

Serve.