10/22/16

This week’s dinner plans!

Hello friends and foodies!

Our free weekly dinnerplans have posted…and some of my favorites are on the menu!

This week we’ve got some amazing boneless pork recipes on Menu 1, and  and beef round-steak recipes on Menu 2!

Here are my favorites from each…

Chef Perry’s Picks of the Week:

Week 40

Click here for this week’s Dinner Plans!

Password: SimplySmart




MY KITCHEN CookbookDid you know…that every one of our students receive, as their graduation gift, their own free copy of the MY KITCHEN Cookbook, which contains all of the lessons and recipes they’ve learned over the last four weeks, as well as many more using the same basic techniques.

Speaking of which…

Have you picked up YOUR copies?

100% of sales goes to support MY KITCHEN classes, and for each copy you buy, you’re providing two free copies for future students!

Pick up your copies (they make great Christmas presents for kids, teens, or anyone who wants to learn their way around the kitchen) at our secure sales page.

New classes start soon, can’t wait!

Chef Perry
MY KITCHEN Outreach Program

Please feel free to share this post with your friends and family. If they would like to receive their own free weekly meal plans and newsletters, they can sign up by clicking right here!

10/17/16

This week’s dinner recipes are up!

Hello friends and foodies!

Our free weekly dinnerplans have posted…and some of my favorites are on the menu!        

This week we focus on Ground Beef (menu 1) and Whole Chicken (menu 2).

Here are my favorites from each…    

Chef Perry’s Picks of the Week:

Week 37 Free Dinner Plans

Click here for this week’s Dinner Plans!

Password: SimplySmart




MY KITCHEN CookbookDid you know…that every one of our students receive, as their graduation gift, their own free copy of the MY KITCHEN Cookbook, which contains all of the lessons and recipes they’ve learned over the last four weeks, as well as many more using the same basic techniques.

Speaking of which…

Have you picked up YOUR copies?

100% of sales goes to support MY KITCHEN  classes, and for each copy you buy, you’re providing two free copies for future students!

Pick up your copies (they make great Christmas presents for kids, teens, or anyone who wants to learn their way around the kitchen) at our secure sales page.

New classes start soon, can’t wait!

Chef Perry
MY KITCHEN Outreach Program

Please feel free to share this post with your friends and family. If they would like to receive their own free weekly meal plans and newsletters, they can sign up by clicking right here!

04/19/12

Volume 1: Issue 11

 

Week of April 22, 2012

I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food. – W.C. Fields

Hello hautemealers!

First of all, how about that Ground Beef Wellington, and the “Real Deal” Chili from last week? Were those crazy good, or what? We also received some very nice comments on the Lemon Shrimp and Linguine, as well! Which reminds me…always feel free to drop us a note when you’ve especially enjoyed a certain recipe; not only does it make us feel all warm and fuzzy inside, but it helps us decide which recipes we want to re-use occasionally, based on your favorites.

So, the big news this week…online grocery shopping and delivery with our new Express List feature!

If you didn’t receive an email of our blog post on this, visit this link (and make sure to subscribe to the blog where you’re there!)

Here are the highlights:

For the past month or so, we’ve been testing some “grocery home delivery” options, and it looks like the best balance we’ve found between cost, food quality, and ease of use is Safeway.com. (Note: we are not affiliated or in any type of partnership with Safeway or any store, and we tested these services without any discounts or incentives that are not available to any other user of these services.)

One thing that we like about this particular service is the “Express List” feature. Instead of manually entering each ingredient on your shopping list, you can “copy and paste” a single column list directly into the Express List window, and the software will bring up each item in order, so you can choose the brand and/or quantity you want!

From now on, you’re going to notice another page immediately following your regular grocery list. This page will be a single column list of the ingredients you’ll need to order that week, that you can cut and paste into the “Express List” window! Once you’ve done that, you can use the standard hautemealz.com grocery list as a reference for entering the quantities you need to order. If you don’t have an account already, you can search your zip-code, and create an account at this link. (If Safeway doesn’t deliver to your area, check out the list of alternative vendors at the bottom of the post.)

Make sure to read the blog post, “Grocery Home Delivery” to get more information and specific details on how to use this great service!

The hautemealz.com team

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Be sure to hook up with us (socially, of course) at…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hautemealz
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauteMealz
and, of course…
Our Blog: http://hautemealzblog.wordpress.com/

Oh, and if you’re one of those crazy pinners (like us)…pin us, baby, pin us!

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TIP OF THE WEEK: KEEPING KNIVES SHARP

One of the biggest culprits for dull kitchen knives is the dishwasher. In a dishwasher, the knife edges are much more likely to get banged around with other silverware or dishes. This banging around will cause small imperfections in your knife edge and dull it quickly. Always wash your knives by hand, which also saves the handle material from the soaking and the high heat of a dishwasher.

When washing knives by hand, avoid the temptation of soaking your knives in your cleaning water, in addition to possibly damaging the wooden handles, sharp knives are not something you want lurking in your cloudy dishwater. Once your knife is properly washed, dry it thoroughly before putting it away.

 Do you have a tip you’d like to share with your fellow hautemealz.com subscribers?

If so, send it to us!

If we use it, you’ll be entered into a monthly poll and a chance to win a $10.00 Starbucks/Dutch Bros/ or Jamba Juice gift card!

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INGREDIENT OF THE WEEK:  GARBANZO BEANS (CHICKPEAS)

The garbanzo bean (also ceci bean, chickpea =, chana, sanagalu Indian pea, Bengal gram) is a legume that is not only high in protein, but it is one of the earliest cultivated vegetables; 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East!

Domesticated garbanzo beans have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They are found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BCE) at Thessaly, and Mesolithic layers in a cave at L’Abeurador, Aude have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790 BC.

By the Bronze Age, garbanzo beans were known in Italy and Greece. In classical Greece, they were called erébinthos and eaten as a staple, a dessert, or consumed raw when young. The Romans knew several varieties such as venus, ram, and punic chickpeas. They were both cooked down into a broth and roasted as a snack. The Roman gourmet Apicius gives several recipes for garbanzo beans. Carbonized chickpeas have been found at the Roman legion fort at Neuss (Novaesium), Germany in layers from the first century AD, along with rice. In 1793, ground-roast garbanzo beans were noted by a German writer as a coffee substitute in Europe. In the First World War, they were grown for this use in some areas of Germany. They are still sometimes brewed instead of coffee.

Mature garbanzo beans can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into a flour called gram flour (also known as chickpea flour and besan and used frequently in Indian cuisine), ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, stirred into a batter and baked to make farinata.

Hummus is the Arabic word for garbanzo beans, which are often cooked and ground into a paste and mixed with tahini, sesame seed paste, the blend called hummus bi tahini. Some varieties of garbanzo beans can even be popped and eaten like popcorn!

Garbanzo beans are a helpful source of zinc, folate and protein. They are also very high in dietary fiber and hence a healthy source of carbohydrates for persons with insulin sensitivity or diabetes. They are low in fat and most of this is polyunsaturated. Recent studies have also shown that they can assist in lowering of cholesterol in the bloodstream.

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FEATURED RECIPE (GF): Sweet n’ Salty Garbanzo Beans

Sweet n’ Salty Garbanzo Beans

1 can (14 oz) garbanzo beans, drained
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon cinnamon or your spice(s) of choice
1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Place garbanzo beans on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a Silpat.

Bake at 450 F for 30 minutes. (You didn’t miss anything here.  You don’t oil or season them until after they are done.  In fact, for an extra healthy treat, try them when they get out of the oven before even adding the oil!)

Transfer chickpeas to a bowl and mix thoroughly with the rest of the ingredients.

Eat the chickpeas hot by the handful, for an awesome, and healthy, gluten-free snack! Fair warning…they’re addictive!

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 CHERYL’S HEALTH TIP…

The liver is the most important organ for detoxifying the body. Eating broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts, kale and cauliflower increase the capacity of the liver to detoxify harmful toxins from your body.

Health Coach Cheryl Cranston, M.Ed.  is an over-60 grandma with a youthful spirit.

Zumba instructor, speaker, writer, and educator, Cheryl’s passion is inspiring women over 50 to be healthy, fit, strong, and full of purpose!

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hautemealz.com

E-mail: perry@hautemealz.com
PO Box 21, Wilsonville Oregon, 97062

http://www.hautemealz.com
Copyright 2012, Perry P. Perkins

04/8/12

Volume 1: Issue 9

The “Amazing Meals Made Easy” system for the busy food lover!

Week of April 8, 2012

“Cooking is like love, it should be entered into with abandon or not at all.” –  Harriet Van Horne

Happy Easter everyone!

How many of you are doing our “Elegant (and easier) Easter Dinner” recipe tomorrow? I’ve already got the Garlic and Rosemary Leg o’ Lamb rubbed with spices, and my Potato, Leek, and Asparagus Gratin is tucked safely in the fridge. Can’t wait to dig in tomorrow! If you’re doing one of these recipe, let us know how it goes, and post some pictures on the Facebook page or the hautemealz.com blog!

The hand’s down big hit on this week’s menu, for me, has to be the Slow-Cooker Beef Short Ribs with Simple Snow Peas. Savory, sweet, sticky beef candy…need I say more?

Continue reading

03/20/12

Volume 1: Issue 7

 

The “Amazing Meals Made Easy” system for the busy food lover!

Week of March 18, 2012

Hello friends and family! How are those corned beef sandwiches coming along? Sometimes I think the best meals come a day or two after the holiday. (At least, for the cook!)

Obviously, the corned beef got high marks on last week’s menu, but that Skirt Steak Taco Salad is one of my all time favorites, and Seared Scallops, well…they’re seared scallops, what’s not to love?

So, you got to try out the new shopping list format? What did you think? Feel free to reply to this email, or post on the blog or Facebook page, and let us know!

Couple of other things to keep an eye out for, this week…

For this week’s Salmon Wasabi with Bok Choy and Shiitakes: If you’re concerned that the wasabi may light your fire a bit too much, check out our recipe for Lemon Dill Yogurt Sauce, it’s a family favorite! Because this might be a big deal at your table (as it is at mine, lol) I’ll make this one this week’s featured recipe (below), as well.

Also, as that recipe is pretty light on calories, you can add an additional vegetable, or starch, if you like. We recommend the Brown Rice & Mushroom Pilaf with Asparagus, (150 calories per serving). So easy, and sooo good!

Have a delicious week!

The hautemealz.com team

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Be sure to hook up with us (socially, of course) at…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hautemealz
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauteMealz
and, of course…
Our Blog: http://hautemealzblog.wordpress.com/

Oh, and if you’re one of those crazy pinners (like us)…pin us, baby, pin us!

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INGREDIENT OF THE WEEK: HAM

Ham is the cut of meat from the thigh of the hind leg of an animal, especially pigs. The word ham is derived from the Old English ham or hom meaning the hollow or bend of the knee.

Fresh ham is an uncured hind leg of pork. Country ham is uncooked, cured, dried, smoked or unsmoked, made from a single piece of meat from the hind leg of a hog or from a single piece of meat from a pork shoulder (picnic ham). Country ham typically is saltier and less sweet than city ham. Virginia’s Smithfield ham, a country ham, must be grown and produced in or around Smithfield, Virginia, to be sold as a Smithfield ham. Similar hams from Tennessee and the Appalachians have a similar method of preparation, but may include honey in their cures and be hickory smoked.

Standard pork, like chops, are raw and unpreserved. When heat is applied to the meat a chemical reaction happens that turns the hemoglobin white. This also happens when an acid is applied to meats. The pink color of ham develops in the curing process which involves salt and usually either nitrites or nitrates. The nitrate cure is used for product that will either be kept a long time or at room temperature like dry salami. Most hams are cured with nitrite and salt today.

The cure prevents the growth of unhealthy bacteria before enough moisture is withdrawn by the salt.

In Italy, ham is called prosciutto, and can be either cured (prosciutto crudo) or cooked (prosciutto cotto). Earliest evidence of ham production in Italy comes from the Republican Roman period (400-300 BC). * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

FEATURED RECIPE

Lemon Dill Yogurt Sauce

Posted on March 18, 2012 | Leave a comment

It was suggested, by certain spouses who shall remain unnamed , that the wasabi sauce for this week’s Salmon Wasabi with Bok Choy and Shiitakes, might be a bit on the…piquant…side for some folk’s palates.

The follow recipe was suggested for those who would rather go mild than wild (speaking strictly about food, of course)…the fact that this is the unnamed spouses’ very favorite salmon recipe had nothing, I’m sure, to do with it…

Enjoy!

-Perry

Lemon Dill Sauce
(Serves 6)

2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper
6 ounces plain Greek-style yogurt
1/8 cup chopped fresh dill
1 large clove garlic, finely chopped

Whisk together the yogurt, 2 teaspoons of lemon juice, dill, pepper, and garlic.

Serve with salmon

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CHERYL’S HEALTH TIP…

Black is the new healthy!

You can trim your meal sizes by putting white foods, on dark plates. Believe it or not, this works!

Those who did so consumed significantly less than those  who ate from white dishes (Journal of Consumer Research).

So color code your diet if you’re trying to lose weight!

Health Coach Cheryl Cranston is an over-60 grandma with a youthful spirit.

Zumba instructor, speaker, writer, and educator, Cheryl’s passion is inspiring women over 50 to be healthy, fit, strong and full of purpose!

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hautemealz.com

E-mail: perry@hautemealz.com
PO Box 21, Wilsonville Oregon, 97062

http://www.hautemealz.com
Copyright 2012, Perry P. Perkins

03/11/12

Volume 1: Issue 6

 

The “Amazing Meals Made Easy” system for the busy food lover!

Week of March 11, 2012

Hello Peeps! Well, one of my favorite foodie holidays is coming up…St. Patrick’s Day! Bring on the corned beef and cabbage, baby! Speaking of which, we have a great slow-cooker Corned Beef & Cabbage recipe for you this week. A little splash of cider vinegar really brings out the flavor of that brisket!

That said, and as much as I love my corned beef, it’s a toss-up as to which recipe was the biggest party in my mouth this week, that Skirt Steak Taco Salad with Fire Roasted Steak Salsa is pretty amazing, too. If you’ve never experimented with skirt-steak before…are you in for a treat! It’s my favorite cut of beef.

A heads up…my fellow menu planner, and foodie extraordinaire, Terry Ramsey, spent some time at his computer this week, and re-designed the format we use for your weekly grocery lists. We think you’re really going to like the new look!

Oh, and that reminds me, please remember, when you make a hautemealz.com recipe that really fires your rockets, please shoot us an email, or post on the blog, or the Facebook page and let us know so we can work it back into the menu rotation. Otherwise, it might be a long time before you see it again!

Couple of other things to keep an eye out for, this week…

So, this week, in your hautemealz.com menus, you’re going to find several recipes that use chicken meat from pre-cooked deli chickens. If you haven’t cut up a lot of chickens at this point in your culinary history, make sure to visit the blog and watch a short video on how easy it is to carve a whole roast chicken.

For the Skirt Steak Taco Salad recipe make sure to check out our instructional blog post, How to slice Skirt Steak…it could be the difference between chewing on a beef-flavored tire, and savoring a buttery, melt-in-your-mouth-tender slice of steak!

Have a delicious week!

The hautemealz.com team

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Be sure to hook up with us (socially, of course) at…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hautemealz
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauteMealz
and, of course…
Our Blog: http://hautemealzblog.wordpress.com/

Oh, and if you’re one of those crazy pinners (like us)…pin us, baby, pin us!

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INGREDIENT OF THE WEEK: BRISKET

Brisket is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest of beef. The brisket muscles include the superficial and deep pectorals. As cattle do not have collar bones, these muscles support about 60% of the body weight of standing/moving cattle. This requires a significant amount of connective tissue, so the resultingly tough meat must be cooked correctly to tenderize the connective tissue.

Popular methods in the Southern United States include rubbing with a spice rub or marinating the meat, then cooking slowly over indirect heat from charcoal or wood. This is a form of smoking the meat. Additional basting of the meat is often done during the cooking process. This normally tough cut of meat, due to the collagen fibers that make up the significant connective tissue in the cut, is tenderized when the collagen gelatinizes, resulting in more tender brisket, despite the fact that the cut is usually cooked well beyond what would normally be considered “well done”.

Slow-smoked brisket is a signature dish for our barbecue team, and Pit Master Chris Renner, in particular, has a special touch for turning the tough muscle into smoky beef perfection. Chris’s brisket recipe (and many more of our bbq and grilling specialties) are available in the team’s cookbook, MEAT FIRE GOOD.)  If you’re a hautemealz.com subscriber, contact us to get you member discount on this, or any of our titles.

In traditional Jewish cooking, brisket is most often braised as a pot roast, especially as a holiday main course, usually served at Rosh Hashannah, Passover, and Shabbat. In Hong Kong, it is cooked with spices over low heat until tender, and is commonly served with noodles in soup or curry. It is a common cut of meat for use in Vietnamese phở soup, as well.

Brisket is also the most popular cut for corned beef, though the term comes not from the grain corn, but from the treatment of the meat with “corns” of salt.

In the U.S. and Canada, consumption of corned beef is often associated with the Saint Patrick’s Day favorite, Corned Beef & Cabbage. Corned beef is not considered an Irish national dish, and the connection with Saint Patrick’s Day specifically originates as part of Irish-American culture, and is often part of their celebrations in North America.[13] In Ireland, the closest traditional dish is bacon and cabbage (more akin to Canadian style bacon or ham). Corned beef and cabbage became popular in the U.S. after Irish immigrants in the northeast used corned beef instead of pork in the dish. This substitution was likely due to the low cost of corned beef in the U.S.

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FEATURED RECIPE

Perry’s Favorite Corned Beef Sandwich

Serves 4

1 whole baguette, soft
16 ounces leftover corned beef, warm
8 ounces Swiss cheese, deli sliced
4 Tbs horseradish mustard

Preheat your oven to 200f.

Bring corned beef broth (reserved from the slow cooker) to steaming on the stovetop, or in the microwave. Remove from heat and add the chopped or sliced corned beef, allow beef to warm in broth for about 10 minutes.

Slice baguette into 4 equal sections (halve, and then halve again), then slice each section horizontally, like a sandwich. Smear the bottom half of each section with horseradish mustard, and arrange corned beef on bottom half of sandwich, dividing meat evenly between the sections.

Arrange cheese to cover the meat, the close up your sandwiches.

The next two steps are the KEY to the awesomeness…

 1 – Wrap each sandwich tightly in foil.

 2 – Place sandwiches in warm over UPSIDE DOWN and allow to rest 10 minutes.

Unwrap and serve as is, or with kosher dill pickle spears.

Note: To “rueben-ize” this baby, replace the horseradish mustard with thousand-island dressing, and add 1/4 cup (warmed & well drained) sauerkraut to each sandwich, just before wrapping in foil.

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hautemealz.com

E-mail: perry@hautemealz.com
PO Box 21, Wilsonville Oregon, 97062

http://www.hautemealz.com
Copyright 2012, Perry P. Perkins

02/26/12

Volume 1: Issue 4

The “Amazing Meals Made Easy” system for the busy food lover!

Week of February 26, 2012

For all of our new folks, welcome to the hautemealz.com eNewsletter! For the rest of you…how about that Polpette Di Carne last week, eh? We received some very nice email comments on that one…glad you liked it! (It was my favorite too!)

This week was another tough call as to which dinner was my favorite. The Stromboli was awesome, but so was the Chicken BLT Salad (I loved that avocado dressing!) Guess it’s a good thing I got to have them both!

Couple of things to keep an eye out for, this week

Continue reading

02/12/12

Newsletter Volume 1: Issue 3

 

 The “Amazing Meals Made Easy” system for the busy food lover!

Week of February 12, 2012

For all of our new folks, welcome to the hautemealz.com eNewsletter! For the rest of you…a month of menus already! Can you believe it?!?

This week’s menu is dedicated to our good friends Dan and Jeni…and their two favorite proteins. It’s gonna to be a fun one! How many completely unique, amazingly easy, and supremely sumptuous meals can you make from just two main ingredients like chicken breasts and ground beef?

Well…you’re about to find out!

Continue reading