11/27/15
Bacon Apple Cheddar Dutch Baby

Bacon Apple Cheddar Dutch Baby #‎BakeItForward

Bacon Apple Cheddar Dutch Baby

My first Bacon Apple Cheddar Dutch Baby…and it was awesome!

FYI… Food Network will donate $1 for each share of this post to one of my favorite causes, No Kid Hungry!

Just make sure to include this message, with the #‎BakeItForward hashtag!

So, share, share, share!

Chef Perry
www.joinmykitchen.com

Bacon-Apple-Cheddar Dutch Baby

A Dutch baby pancake, sometimes called a German pancake, a Bismarck, or a Dutch puff, is a sweet popover that is normally served for breakfast. It is derived from the German pfannkuchen.

1 apple, cored and sliced thin
2 tablespoons lemon juice
6 tablespoons sweet cream butter (3 melted)
3/4 cup self-rising flour
1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup whole milk, room temperature
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
5 large eggs, room temp.
8 strips cooked apple-wood thick bacon, chopped
1 cup extra sharp Cheddar Cheese, grated

Toss apple slices in lemon juice. Melt butter.

Preheat your oven to 375°F. Place a 10-inch baking dish in oven, and allow the pan to heat up. (3-4 minutes)

In a large bowl (if you have a stick blender, if not use a mixer), add the 3 Tbs of melted butter, flour, cornmeal, milk, salt, sugar, and eggs. Mix until smooth, then add the bacon and cheese. Stir.

Remove the baking dish from the oven, add the rest of the butter, and let it melt. Then layer the bottom with apple slices, and pour the batter over the top.

Bake until puffy and golden, about 30 minutes, then remove from the oven and let rest 10-15 minutes.

Slice and serve!

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

11/24/15
La Caja China Party!

Hot off the Press ~ La Caja China Party!

La Caja China Party!

Just in time for Christmas!

  • 13 Themes
  • 85 Recipes
  • 160+ Photos

This is it folks, my best La Caja China Cookbook to date, fully illustrated… and perfect for using the magic box to create amazing memories for every occasion!  In the box, on the grill, sides, desserts, and the perfect drinks!

Get your copy now, directly from the publisher!
(Also available here, on Amazon.com.)

Chef Perry P. Perkins
Author
“La Caja China Cooking”
“La Caja China World”
“La Caja China Smoke”

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this post, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

11/20/15
Chili stuffed baked potatoes

No fuss “Baked Potatoes” in the Crockpot

Chili stuffed baked potatoes

Ah, winter’s coming, the evenings are getting cold, and there’s nothing I like better on a cold night than a nice baked potato stuffed with our “real deal” chili, and topped with some cheddar, and onions!

Mmm…

The only problem is I don’t usually have the time (or the patience) to wait around for potatoes to bake, once I get home. Here’s a great solution that I found years ago…”baked” potatoes in the crockpot!

That’s right, pop ’em in the crock in the morning, and by the time you get home that night, you’ll have a perfect baked potato hot and waiting for you!

Here’s a little video I threw together to show you just how easy it really is…

Enjoy!

Chef Perry
joinmykitchen.com

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

11/17/15
Spatchcocked Turkeys

The Perfect 90 Minute Roast Turkey

Wanna save a little time in the kitchen this Thanksgiving or Christmas?

Check out our video for the Perfect 90 Minute Roast Turkey…

Now, I know what you’re thinking… “but…but…what about the stuffing? Where do I put my stuffing?”

do you really think I’d forsake the stuffing? wink emoticon Rack goes in the roasting pan, hot stuffing goes on the rack, surround stuffing with a long, folded strip of foil, place turkey on top.

When the turkey is done, move it to another pan to rest, crank up the broiler, and pop the pan with the stuffing back in (remove foil), and roast until browned and crispy to your liking.

Note: Do NOT add ANY salt to your stuffing! A brined turkey produces a lot of VERY salty drippings, which are going to flavor a spatchcocked bird way more that a whole one, as ALL of the meat is crying on the stuffing, not just the breasts, which typically produce the least broth.

Oh, and I always use unseasoned bread crumbs, and typically make my own. It’s easy!

Check out our post, “Highway Robbery! (Or…how to make your own breadcrumbs this year.)”

If you love it, share it!

Chef Perry
joinmykitchen.com

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

11/16/15

Grilled Cranberry Balsamic Brussel Sprouts

Let’s face it, there’s no “wrong” time to fire up your gas or charcoal grill, and Thanksgiving and Christmas are certainly no exception.

Sure, the weather might be a little cooler, the days a little shorter, and some of you may have to shovel a path through the snow to your grill, but that’s a small price to pay for some smoky, seared treats to go with all of that turkey and pumpkin pie, right?

Right?

Okay, I’ll meet you halfway… here’s one of my favorite holiday side dishes that require minimum time outdoors, while still bringing tons of great grill flavor to the party!

Balsamic Cranberry Brussels Sprouts

Balsamic Cranberry Brussels Sprouts

I tested this recipes on some friends recently, one of whom informed me that while she despised Brussels sprouts, she would “try one” for me. She made a point of telling me, after dinner, that she had gone back for seconds. If you know folks who’ve never met a Brussels spout they loved… this is a good one to introduce them to!

  • 1 lb. Brussels sprouts*
  • 32 oz. chicken broth
  • Salt and pepper
  • 15 oz. jellied cranberry sauce
  • 1/2 c. balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 4 skewers, soaked
* For even cooking, try to pick Brussels sprouts of a uniform in size and shape

Meanwhile, bring the chicken broth to simmer in a stock pot. Cut off the stem end of the Brussels sprouts and remove any off-color outer leaves.

Best Brussels Sprouts Recipe

Best Brussels Sprouts Recipe

One of our MY KITCHEN students, prepping Brussel sprouts.

Add the Brussels sprouts to the chicken stock, return to a simmer (if necessary, add water until sprouts are just covered), and cook 8 to 10 minutes, stirring often, until they are still firm, but you can poke a skewer through them.

Drain and allow the sprouts to cool until you can handle them. Skewer 6 to 8 sprouts onto each skewer, and brush with reduction sauce.

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday. Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

Place the skewers onto the grill over medium heat. Cover and cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Turn the skewers over and continue to cook for another 2 minutes.

Serve as is or for an extra punch of flavor, remove the sprouts from the skewers, plate, and drizzle with remaining reduction sauce.

Serves 4

11/14/15
The best brined turkey recipe

The best brined turkey recipe. Ever.

Best Brined Turkey Recipe

Even my Mother-In-Law said this was the best turkey she’d ever had. High praise, indeed!

I gotta say, if given a choice I will never, NEVER serve another turkey (or chicken) that has not been brined. The improvement in moistness, flavor, and general “cook-ability” makes it a no-brainer.

The aromatics make a huge difference as well. My wife had made it clear that the testing is over, THIS is our Thanksgiving turkey recipe from now on, and no modifications are allowed, lol.

The best brined turkey recipe

The Perfect 90 Minute Roast Turkey

(Oh, and want to have this beautiful bird cooked and ready for the table in less than 2 hours? Check out our video post: “Perfect Roast Turkey in 90 Minutes!“)

The Best Brined Turkey. Ever.

* 1 (14 to 16 pound) frozen young turkey

For the brine:
* 1 cup kosher salt
* 1 cup of honey
* 1 quart turkey stock
* 1 quart boiling water
* 2 tablespoon black pepper
* 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped candied ginger
* 1 gallon heavily iced water

For the aromatics:
* 1 red apple, sliced
* 2 med pears, sliced
* 1 onion, sliced
* 1 cinnamon stick
* 1 cup water
* 4 sprigs rosemary
* 6 leaves sage
* Canola oil

2 to 3 days before roasting:

  • Begin thawing the turkey in the refrigerator or in a cooler kept at 38 degrees F.
  • Combine the stock, water, salt, honey, peppercorns, and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Stir occasionally to dissolve solids and bring to a boil.
  • Remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate.

How to brine a turkeyEarly on the day or the night before you’d like to eat:

    • Combine the brine, water and ice in the 5-gallon bucket. Place the thawed turkey (with innards removed) breast side down in brine.
    • If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area for 8 to 16 hours, turning the bird once half way through brining.
    • Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Remove the bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard the brine.
    • Place the bird on roasting rack, breast up, inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.
    • Combine the apple, pears, onion, cinnamon stick, and 1 cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes. Add steeped aromatics to the turkey’s cavity along with the rosemary and sage. Tuck the wings underneath the bird and coat the skin liberally with canola oil.

 

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids through our MY KITCHEN Program!

 

  • Roast the turkey, breast up, on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F for 30 minutes, watching closely as it browns. Flip and insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Set the thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees F.
  • A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting.
  • Let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil for 20-30 minutes before carving.

 

11/13/15

Thanksgiving Turkey Explosion Recipe

Thanksgiving Turkey Explosion

Okay, so I wanted to come up with something unique for Thanksgiving, and, of course, I wanted to incorporate barbeque in the process. Unfortunately, I have a dirty little secret…I don’t really like smoked turkey all that much.

(Okay pit-masters, now unclench and read the rest…)

Something I do love, however, is the Bacon Explosion (or “Fatty”) – the pork-wrapped torpedo of yummy goodness.

With that vision of fatty loveliness firmly in my mind, I took my basic BE recipe and decided to transform it into a Thanksgiving goodie, modifying the basic ingredients of the holiday. Ground turkey and mushroom stuffing for the insides, a cranberry barbeque glaze, etc.

As you can see in the pictures below, it turned out nicely, and everyone raved about it. So…yah!

The only problem is…I don’t have a good name for it, and while I kinda like the name “turkey explosion” (in a twisted, WKRP sort of way) it doesn’t really describe the dish.

So…take a look at the recipe and pictures below, ponder a moment (or as long as you need) and come up with something short and descriptive. Funny is always good, but not a requirement. You can click on the thumbnails for larger images.

The title I like best will forever be bestowed on the recipe, and the winner will receive a free copy of the (very) soon to be released, MEAT FIRE GOOD, Burnin’ Love BBQ’s first cookbook. Nearly a hundred of our favorite recipes with full color pictures.

Also, this recipe will be included in the cookbook, along with a special thank you to the winner. (Eternal literary glory – Woo-Hoo!!!)

Okay…here it is:

1 pound sliced bacon
1.5 pounds ground turkey
1 tablespoon each sage, garlic powder, salt, pepper
1 cups breadcrumbs
1/2 sweet onion, diced fine
1/4 lb Mushrooms. sliced thin
2 stalks celery, diced fine
2 Tbs fresh minced garlic
1/4 cup sweet cream butter
1/4 cup turkey rub (see below)
3/4 cup cranberry barbecue sauce (see below)

Mix ground turkey with 1 tablespoon each sage, garlic powder, salt, pepper. Refrigerate 2-3 hours.

Using 10 slices of bacon, weave a square lattice like that on top of a pie: first, place 5 bacon slices side by side on a large sheet of aluminum foil, parallel to one another, sides touching. Place another strip of bacon on one end, perpendicular to the other strips.

Fold first, third and fifth bacon strips back over this new strip, then place another strip next to it, parallel to it. Unfold first, third and fifth strips; fold back second and fourth strips. Repeat with remaining bacon until all 10 strips are tightly woven. (The instructions are a lot more complicated that the actual process!)
MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

Sprinkle with some of the rub.

Preheat oven to 225 degrees or light a fire in an outdoor smoker. Sautee onion, celery, minced garlic, and mushroom in butter until wilted but still crisp, drain. Toss with breadcrumbs and a little additional salt and pepper, press and cool. You want the mixture to still be fairly dry.

Evenly spread ground turkey on top of the bacon lattice, pressing to within 1/2 inch of the outer edges of the bacon. Sprinkle with rub.

Spread a thin layer of stuffing mixture over the ground turkey, pressing to 1/2 inch of the outer edges of the turkey.

Very carefully separate front edge of sausage layer from bacon weave and begin rolling sausage away from you, rolling the stuffing into the center. Bacon weave should stay where it was, flat. Press turkey roll to remove any air pockets and pinch together the seams and ends to seal.

Thanksgiving Turkey Fatty

Roll turkey toward you, this time with bacon weave, until it is completely wrapped. Turn it so seam faces down. Roll should be about 2 to 3 inches thick.

Place roll on a baking sheet in oven or in smoker. Cook until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees on a meat thermometer, about 1 hour for each inch of thickness.

When about 30 minutes from done, glaze the roll with sauce. To serve, slice into 1/4- to- 1/2-inch rounds. Serve on potato rolls with a side of warmed cranberry barbeque sauce.

Garlic mashed potatoes and turkey gravy make a nice Thanksgiving accompaniment.

TURKEY EXPLOSION RUB

2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoons black pepper
1 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoons dry mustard
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
2 Tbs white sugar

Mix all ingredients together. Store in an airtight container. Keep in a cool, dark place.

CRANBERRY BARBEQUE SAUCE

1 Can Cranberry Sauce (jellied).
1/4 Cup Brown Sugar
1/2 Jalapeno, seeded, rinsed, and finely diced
1/4 Cup Orange Juice
1/4 Cup Ketchup
1/4 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Tsp Yellow Mustard

Empty cranberry sauce into 2 quart saucepan blender, add the remaining ingredients, whisk, and cook, over medium heat, until simmering.

Cook until the mixture is thick like barbecue sauce.

11/12/15

Cook the World ~ Russian Chicken Kotletki with Sour Cream Mushroom Sauce & Sweet Cabbage Salad

This is our third post, as my six-year old daughter and I continue our journey to cook our way around the world.

Approximately once a week, Grace will pick a country and we’ll research the food of that nation and pick a traditional dish that we want to try. We’ll shop and cook together, and maybe even work in a side trip to an ethnic market or food-truck, once in a while.

We’ll post our processes, notes, and maybe a brief anecdote, but mostly it’s going to be about the recipes.

Russian Chicken KotletkiFebruary 16th, 2014

Last time, we visited the Hawaiian Islands for one of my all-time favorite foods: Salmon Poke. This week, Gracie went for that big orange country at the top of the map…Russia!

Russia is by area the largest country in the world, with a hugely diverse cuisine, so it would be nearly impossible to chose a single dish that would represent all of it. Its foundations were laid by the peasant food of the rural population in an often harsh climate, with a combination of plentiful fish, poultry, game, cabbage, berries, and honey.

Additionally, Russia cuisine enjoys a plethora of breads, pancakes, cereals, beer and, of course, the ubiquitous Russian vodka.

Mushrooms are also a huge part of Russian cuisine and they are included in just about every way possible. With the addition of sour cream and fresh dill, the flavor profile of this week’s dish is classic Russian.

Here are some things we learned about Russia:

~ Russia is so big that it includes 11 time zones. At its easternmost point, Russia is only about 50 miles from Alaska.

~ In the city, most people live in high-rise apartments. The apartments are small and some families share kitchens or bathrooms.

~ A traditional Russian meal consists of fish, potatoes, vegetables and bread. Fresh meat and vegetables were once very hard to get, but new trade agreements have increased the supply.

~ Only about 10% of the land in Russia can be used for farming because of the cold. The largest crops grown are potatoes, barley, and wheat.

Russian Chicken Kotletki


Chicken Kotletki with Sour Cream Mushroom Sauce & Sweet Cabbage Salad
Serves 4

4 cups cooked long grain rice, hotRussian Chicken Kotletki
2 1/2 cups cubed cooked chicken*
2 Tbsp. butter
16 oz button mushrooms
1 onion, chopped
1 celery stalk, chopped
thyme
salt, pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 Tablespoon flour
1 1/4 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 Tbsp. sour cream
2 Tbsp. fresh dill, minced

Mise en Place

Cube chicken (equal parts white and dark meat), clean and quarter mushrooms, chop onion and celery. Mince garlic and dill.

Need some help with your chopping, dicing, and mincing? See this post.

*You can bake your own chicken or use a store-bought rotisserie chicken for this dish.

Russian Chicken Kotletki

Prepare the Dish

Melt the butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Add the fresh mushrooms, onion, celery, garlic, and thyme (whole stalk). Season with salt and pepper. Add flour, mix well, and cook for about 10 minutes.

Pour in the chicken broth, heavy cream, and sour cream. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook ten minutes to thicken.

3Stir in the cooked chicken and stir to coat the chicken evenly. Let rest, off heat, 10 minutes. Remove thyme stem.

Sprinkle Kotletki with fresh dill, and serve over hot rice, with cabbage salad.

Sweet Cabbage Salad

The sweet-tart, acidic component to this salad pairs perfectly with the rich, luxurious mushroom sauce in the Kotletki.

1 half a small head of cabbage
2 small cucumbers
1 large carrot
1 celery stalk
1 medium yellow bell pepper
8 radishes
1 apple
fresh herbs (scallions, dill, parsley)
2-3 Tbsp. sunflower oil
2-3 Tbsp. distilled white vinegar
1 Tbsp. sugar
salt, pepper, to taste

Shred cabbage. Julienne cukes, carrots, and bell pepper. Slice celery, apple, and radishes (thin). Mince herbs.

For the dressing: Combine oil, vinegar, sugar, salt, and pepper in a bowl, and whisk to combine.

Toss veggies with dressing and serve immediately, or chill up to 1 hour.

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

11/6/15
Roast Thanksgiving Turkey Risotto

My favorite post-Thanksgiving dish: Roast Turkey Risotto

Okay, so we’ve covered how to reheat turkeys and hams, and some great recipes for finishing off leftover ham. Now, let’s talk turkey…specifically, let’s talk turkey leftovers.

There are tons of recipes online for leftover turkey so I’m not going to re-hash (ha!) them here. Instead, I’m going to share with ya’all my one go-to recipe that I always make in the days following a bird roastin’….Roast Turkey Risotto.

Risotto is a class of Italian dishes of rice cooked in broth to a creamy consistency. The broth may be meat-based, fish-based, or vegetable-based; many kinds include Parmesan cheese, butter, and onion. It is one of the most common ways of cooking rice in Italy. Properly cooked risotto is rich and creamy but still with some resistance or bite: al dente, and with separate grains. The traditional texture is fairly fluid, or all’onda (“wavy, or flowing in waves”). It is served on flat dishes and it should easily spread out but not have excess watery liquid around the perimeter. It must be eaten at once as it continues to cook in its own heat and can become too dry with the grains too soft. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risotto)

“How rice arrived in Italy is a controversial issue,” say Anna Maria Volpi, Culinary teacher and author of the FANTASTIC Italian food blog, Anna Maria’s Open Kitchen. “It is known that the Arabs brought rice to Sicily and Spain. They probably got it from India and extended its use through the territory under their control.

Rice was brought into the Po Valley in the fourteenth century—probably from Spain—and found the perfect environment and climate: flat lands, abundance of water, and humidity. Rice cultivation became intensive in the area for the centuries that followed, so much so that rice became a staple in that part of Italy.”

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

Now, despite my own Italian heritage, risotto wasn’t a dish that was prepared out own house, and this recipe was one that was passed along to me by Nona on her death-bed. I created this off-the-cuff recipe one day several years ago, the day after Thanksgiving in fact, when I was trying to come up with a dish worthy of the pan full of golden delicious turkey broth I was staring at.

It turned out to be a hit.

As my fellow foodie Chef Chris Renner would say, “I’d rather be lucky than good!”

Just a note – many folks think that risotto is a hoity-toity dish, reserved for fancy restaurants and accomplished chefs. Nothing could be further from the truth! Risotto is a very simple dish who’s most important ingredient is patience…patience and a big spoon. You’re going to to stirring constantly, so make sure that everything else is prepared for the meal in advance.

Roast Thanksgiving Turkey RisottoRoast Turkey Risotto

5 Cups Turkey broth* (& pan scrapin’s)
1 cup dry white wine
2 Cups cubed turkey
2 Cups Arborio rice
1 leek, sliced thin
1 Cup sliced crimini mushrooms
1/2 sweet onion, diced
2 Tbs fresh garlic, diced
3/4 Cup parmigiano reggiano, grated
2 Tbs butter, divided
2 Tbs olive oil, divided
Salt & pepper to taste

*If you didn’t save your turkey broth, you can swap this out with 8 teaspoons of Better Than Bullion chicken base, mixed with 5 cups of boiling water.

Heat separated broth and wine to a low simmer, keep hot.

Sautee onion and leeks in 1 Tbs each oil and butter, five minutes. Add mushrooms and garlic and cook five more minutes until mushrooms have just begun to soften.

In a large separate pan, heat the remaining oil and butter, over medium heat and add dry rice. Stir constantly until rice just starts to brown and give off a nutty aroma.

Add sautéed veggies and stir.


Add broth, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring until mostly absorbed. Maintain a constant heat that causes the dish to steam, but not quite simmer (no bubbles.) Repeat until rice becomes creamy and takes on a pearly sheen. Remove from heat and stir in turkey and 1/2 cup cheese. If you run out of broth/wine mixture, continue adding hot water until finished.

Add salt and pepper to taste, sprinkle with remaining cheese, and serve immediately.

Side Dish Recommendation: Steamed asparagus or broccoli goes nicely.

Wine Recommendation: The mushrooms and Parmesan in this dish will go beautifully with a light red Burgundy.

NOTE: I’m not a fan of smoked bird, myself (I’ll take brisket, thanks!) but I’ve been told that this recipe works pretty darn good with leftover smoked turkey, as well.

Enjoy!

Chef Perry

11/5/15

Cook the World Project – Recipe 2: Hawaiian Poke

8

This is our second post, as my six-year old daughter and I begin our journey to cook our way around the world.

Salmon poke recipeApproximately once a week, Grace will pick a country and we’ll research the food of that nation and pick a traditional dish that we want to try. We’ll shop and cook together, and maybe even work in a side trip to an ethnic market or food-truck, once in a while.

We’ll post our processes, notes, and maybe a brief anecdote, but mostly it’s going to be about the recipes.

Last week, we cooked up a delicious pot of “osh” from Uzbekistan.

Hawaiian RecipesThis week Gracie picked one of our families favorite places in the world…The Hawaiian Islands.

Grace has only been there once, and she was still hanging out inside mom’s tum, so she’s really looking forward to seeing more of the sights our next trip.

Oh, and despite the fact that it’s not exactly it’s own country, I’m going to side with the justification that it once was, and stick with that story…my blog, my rules.

As soon as she picked Hawaii, I knew exactly what I wanted to make. As good as my kalua pork is, I had to go with my very favorite dish. Luckily, the kiddo concurred… poke. (don’t worry, I can promise you, there will be more than one recipe from the islands, Spam Musubi comes immediately to mine.)

Salmon Poke

Poke (poke-a) is a raw fish salad served as an appetizer in Hawaiian cuisine. Pokē is the Hawaiian verb for “to slice or cut”. Native Hawaiians have always eaten poke, and it should not be confused with raw fish dishes such as ceviche which use vinegar or citrus juice to “cure” the fish.

For centuries, Hawaiian fishermen cut their catch of raw fish into cubes and seasoned it with whatever ingredients they had. Modern versions make use of seasonings brought by the many different cultures of the Islands, such as soy sauce, onions, tomatoes, and chilies. Poke is so common in the Hawaiian culture, that you can stop at a local grocery store and choose from several freshly made varieties.

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

Now, I’m from Oregon and I’m a fisherman…so I love my salmon. Fresh and firm, in poke it plays perfectly against the crunch of the raw onions. The combination of the furikake seasoning and the shoyu (soy) sauce gives a perfect contrast of sweet, salty, and savory…my favorite combination. Add in just enough red pepper flakes to command your respect without overwhelming the delicate flavor of the salmon, and…well, it’s worth a plane ticket to Oahu!

Things we learned about Hawaii:

  1. Hawaii is the only state that grows coffee.
  2. The largest contiguous ranch, in the United States, is in Hawaii. The Parker Ranch near Kamuela has about 480,000 acres of land.
  3. The big island of Hawaii is the worldwide leader in harvesting macadamia nuts and orchids.
  4. Sea salt was the most common seasoning in ancient Hawaii. It was often mixed together with roasted and mashed kukui nuts and seaweed and was called inamona.
  5. Hawaii residents consume the most Spam per capita in the United States. Spam is so popular in Hawaii that it is sometimes referred to as “The Hawaiian Steak.”

Furikake Salmon Pokē

  • 1 pound sushi grade salmon fillet
  • 1/4 cup diced yellow onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1 Tbs sea salt
  • 1 Tbs crushed red chili flakes (opt)
  • 2 Tbs furikake rice seasoning
  • 2 oz soy sauce
  • 4 oz sugar
  • 1 tsp sesame oil

Salmon Poke

Remove pin bones from salmon fillet. See detailed instructions in this post.

removing pin bones from salmon

Cut salmon fillet into sections, and, sliding a very sharp knife along the bottom of the steak, remove the skin, and cube the meat.

Removing skin from salmon

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

Salmon poke recipe

Refrigerate until ready to serve.

So awesome!

furikake1Furikake

You can get Furikake seasoning at most any Asian market, or try your hand at making your own.

Homemade Furikake Seasoning

  • 1/2 cup raw sesame seeds
  • 1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon sea salt, to taste
  • 3 sheets nori (that stuff you wrap around sushi rolls)
  • 3 heaping tablespoons bonito flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar

Heat a dry, heavy-bottomed skillet to medium high.

Pour in the sesame seeds and shake to distribute evenly over the surface of the skillet.

Toast, shaking occasionally, until the seeds are fragrant. Immediately pour the seeds into a dry, clean bowl to cool and stir in the sea salt. Allow to cool completely before proceeding.

Use kitchen shears cut the nori into 1-inch strips. Stack the strips and cut cross-wise into very thin strips over the bowl of sesame seeds.

Use the kitchen shears again to roughly cut up the bonito flakes.

Add the sugar and stir all ingredients together, then transfer to a jar with a tight fitting lid.

This is ready to use immediately but can be stored in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight for up to two months.