The Problem with Farm to Table

farm to tableOkay, I know that this title is going to bring some folks here lookin’ for a fight, so before you start sharpening your pitchforks and hurling your organic, fair-trade rotten tomatoes…let’s be clear: I love the farm-to-table concept.

I love my local farmer’s markets, and I take every opportunity to support my local artisan food purveyors; in part because I believe it’s the healthy and more socially responsible choice, but also because the food just tastes better!

However, my love and support for the ideal of farm-to-table does not negate that, in practice, the system is flawed.

Maybe a more fitting title would be “Farm to Table…the missing ingredient“, because the farm-to-table model leaves out a critical step…creating a gap that is not just important, but imperative to fill, for the system to work.

Functionally, the equation is actually “farm-to-KITCHEN-to-table” The kitchen is the bridge (or, unfortunately more often the gap) between the farm and the table.

Farmers-Market-foodsWhat good is fresh, organic, sustainable, fair-trade food, if the end-user (the home cook) doesn’t know what it is, or what to do with it, and so won’t buy it?

Side note: my definition of “cooking” is turning raw, unprocessed ingredients into a finished meal with a minimum of pre-made additions.

Part of the issue, I believe, is that foodies, farmers, and people who cook are often amazed at the extent to which other people don’t cook. When my wife, who did not grow up cooking, says to me, “I’m afraid to cook meat”, my eyes tend to glaze over…but she’s not alone. In fact, she’s not even in the minority!

farm to tableDon’t believe me? Test it.

Take a friend with you (and no cherry-pickin’ one of your foodie friends!) to large grocery store or farmer’s market, and see how many vegetables they can name without looking at the label. Then, if you need further convincing, ask they how’d they prepare the ones they did recognize.

This isn’t just about foodies loving good food, or hippies wanting to save the planet…this gap effects our country’s health, ecology, finances…the list goes on.

HEALTH

Fresh, unprocessed, (what we at hautemealz.com like to call “real”) food is better for us, and better for the environment. Everyone knows this.

(By the way, if you’re enjoying this article, you may want to subscribe to our free newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week. Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk teens!)

The number one most effective method of battling the proliferation of processed foods, obesity, diabetes, celiac disease, GMOs, corporate farming, yadda yadda yadda…is to shop, cook, and eat with as few steps as possible between the dirt and the plate. True healthcare begins in the kitchen, not the gym. Most of us know this.

It takes 10 minutes to grill a pork chop and some fresh veggies. Some of us know this.

grilled-pork-chops

However, just knowing the truth is only the first step in slowing our society’s descent into further slavery to the boxed, processed, artificially preserved, instant, easy-to-prepare corporate food masters.

groceryaisleconfusion_thumb

We must increase that knowledge and spread it around. Knowledge is power, and we’ve turned much of the power over to the fast-food corporations. If we don’t know how to cook, believe me, they’ll be more than happy to continue to make our lives “easier” by doing the “hard part”.

Why am I picturing Morlocks and Eloi?

These companies, btw, buy from the agri-conglomerates (or own them outright) many of them in other countries, and NOT from your local, small, organic, fair trade farms…perpetuating the spiral.

Which leads us to…

money_burningFINANCES

Where does a pervasive lack of basic cooking skills lead, from an economic standpoint?

Well, at the residential level, it leads to a reliance on instant, processed, or packaged foods or  eating in restaurants, which isn’t financially sustainable for the average family, unless it spirals down to, as it often does, the local drive though dollar menu.

Even then, we’re spending more than we think. The average cost of a “cheap” drive-thru meal here in Oregon, runs between $3-$4 per person. For a family of four “lite-eaters”, we’re looking at $12-$16 dollars. This is 20-30% more then we spend at our house, cooking quick, simple, healthy meals, often with enough left-overs for lunch the next day.

“Value Menu”…really?

fast food garbageOh, and we don’t toss a big bag full of cardboard, paper and plastic in the trash afterwards, either.

On a “broader” scale (pun intended) the nation’s health care tab stood at $2.7 trillion in 2011, the latest year available.

I don’t think I need to say anything more about that.

EDUCATION

This is the crux of this article. Laws, labeling, testing, etc., can all be good things, but they will never,  ever, replace the ability of the educated consumer to “vote with their checkbooks” by knowing what to buy, and how to prepare it for their families.

il_570xN.332591766We’re moving into a third and fourth generation of people raised without a grasp of basic cooking skills or confidence in the kitchen.

In her article, “Bring Back Home Economics in Schools!(Cooking Light, 2012) Hillary Dowdle refers to herself and her generation as “the ‘lost girls and boys’, saying, “Public health experts , nutritionists, and educators are beginning to realize that the lack of basic life skills, like cooking, presents a serious problem: Americans are growing up ignorant about the whats, whys, and hows of eating healthy.”

Basically, if no one cooked at home, today’s young people’s options are to (a) get a job in a “real food” restaurant kitchen (plan 2-3 years, minimum, before you actually cook anything), or spend thousands (or tens of thousands) on culinary school…which is a pretty deep commitment for someone who just wants to feed their kids a healthy dinner.

Where do most folks end up? Right back on the processed foods aisle, or in the drive-thru.

“(Food) is devalued generally in our education system . . . it’s more than just learning how to cook. It’s about food literacy, which means teaching children what foods to eat and why, how to understand food labeling information and how and why we need to prepare and cook food safely.” says Griffith University School of Education and Professional Studies Dean, Donna Pendergast.

This leads me to a personal soap box…

100years-HomeEc1949

In an article titled, “Compulsory home economics essential to fight childhood obesity“, the home economics advocate blog, HomeEcConnect, states: “We are losing basic survival skills.  Home Economics is essential for learning about the basics of growing, transporting, purchasing, preparing, nutritional values, cooking, presenting, enjoying, cleaning up and storage of food.  ‘Food literacy” is about learning food skills as a holistic concept.”

aubergines-etc-european-cooking-school-princeton-nj

Dr. Arya Sharma (Director of the Canadian Obesity Network) says “time to bring back home economics” because “the art of basic food preparation and meal planning may be a very real part of the obesity solution”.

Our kid’s need to learn to cook good food. Period.

Budget’s are tight, and school days are long, we know. Frankly, I don’t mind a computer doing my math, or my science, but I don’t want one cooking my food. If we’re going to cut something from the curriculum, let’s not make it the one thing that is at the core of our survival and well-being as a species, shall we?

If my daughter’s lack of proficiency in trigonometry means she might live longer than her parents…I’m okay with that.

Speaking of which daughter started learning to cook at three, now, at five, she is an adept omelet, salad, and sandwich maker, a savvy produce shopper, and could give Chef Gordon Ramsey a run for “kitchen tyrant.” She loves to cook, and is more adventurous and open in her eating than most adults I know.

But, not every child has the (sometimes) good fortune of having a father who’s a chef, who’s father was a chef, who’s father was a chef.

What do we do? We fill the gap!

While, in this author’s opinion, mandatory home economics classes, for both genders, are vital…what do we do to help those who are already out of school; folks who have jobs, and families, and bills, and budgets?

We started hautemealz.com, in part, to help fill this gap. We believe that to help people make responsible changes in planning, shopping and cooking, that those changes, to be effective and lasting, must SIMPLIFY their already too-busy lives, instead of further complicating them.

As our subscribers cook their way through their weekly menus, they learn basic cooking and nutrition techniques and skills, sometimes directly from short video clips, blogs posts, and Q & A, but mostly passively, though the hands-on process of actually preparing easy, non-threatening, nutritious recipes. They are introduced to new vegetables, healthier cuts of meat, etc, and soon have a grasp of what’s available, and what to do with it.

We believe that folks who are already spinning a lot of plates need to love it before they learn it, in other words, they need to prepare themselves a simple, delicious meal, before they need to learn why it’s good for them, and we hear this happening time after time from our subscribers.

We prepare a weekly shopping list of ingredients, organized by aisle, which saves them hours of planning and organizing, and we provide a color photo of each dish, so they know what they’re shooting for.

Mother and Daughter Making a Salad

We also encourage our readers to cook with their families, offering simple steps in the recipes that children of various ages can help with, and, hopefully, educating the next generation.

Lastly, we’re here for them. Professional and home cooks ready to answer their questions, provide options, and give tips and advice for exactly what they’re cooking.

That’s what we’re doing at SimplySmartDinnerPlans.com

Here are four things you can do to bridge the gap:

  • Learn to cook, and to cook healthier
  • Teach you kids, grandkids, or any kids to do the same
  • Become a regular customer of your local farmer’s market and independent food purveyor
  • Fight for mandatory food science classes in our public schools, and volunteer at an after-school program. (Those are your tax-dollars, you should have a say in how they’re spent!)

Bottom line: if we can help home-cooks prepare simple, affordable, healthy meals, in the time they have…we capture their attention, and can lead them towards a healthier, more responsible food lifestyle, one they will be explore with a sense of excitement, not guilt or frustration.

Become an advocate for people knowing their way around the kitchen, and you help bridge the gap between farm and table.

Let’s cook!

– Chef Perry

11 thoughts on “The Problem with Farm to Table

  1. SPOT ON!! the old adage about just feeding a needy person versus teaching a needy person applies here big time..surely feed the hungry…surely help the needy, but…TEACH a person, especially when they are teachable..that would be a child…and you now have created something wonderful…food from the ground, sourced locally (when practical, must be flexible here), made in your kitchen, with your hands, your creativity…it’s alarmingly satisfying…and the results are immediate. Continue to promote QUICK AND EASY as the way to live, and we will be in bigger trouble than we are now…this is reversible.

  2. Just last night I fed six people fresh chicken, with rice and fresh vegetables. For about what it would cost for my wife and I to go to a fast food dollar menu. It only took about 30 minutes and we had left overs for lunch today.
    It was simple and quick and tasted way better than the food from the drive-thru.

    Chef Chris

  3. Great article. And I so agree we need to bring food science classes back into schools. If kids are required to take biology they should be required to take one year of food science too. Seems fair to me.

    As far as my family goes I am so thankful my son loves to cook real food and that one of the things my granddaughters love to do is cook with their grandma (me, the baker and garden chef in the family) and their dad who is a dynamite grill chef and cookie master…and also their step-grandma who is teaching them to can! Between all of us we are imparting those skills they can take with them into their own homes. The real beauty is seeing the satisfaction on their faces when they get to taste something they made with their own hands. Priceless.

  4. Great article!! Most people think healthy home-cooked meals are way too expensive. Add organic or directly from the farm and they think they have to be seriously rich to jump on board.No idea really where this comes from. I totally disagree. Great article!

  5. Excellent article. My son (who is now 24) was in Home Ec while the teacher was explaining that the class would be using the “range” for that day’s activities. His partner in the class (a girl) asked “What is a range” What does it do?” She had never used one, any part of it, had only used a micro wave. Her mother did not cook at all, only microwave. Wow. This was in Ashland Oregon by the way…..a town known for its farmer’s markets and farm to table (bypassing the kitchen apparently…) bent. God help us all.

  6. I started cooking on my own accord when I was ten. No one taught me – I just picked it up by following recipes and looking up terms such as “saute” on the internet. By the time I got into high school, I was shocked that my friend did not know how to boil an egg. In college I noticed the same trend. Upon graduated I started non-profit cooking classes for anyone interested. Most of my classes were filled with college students.

    I try my best to help fix this problem by organizing affordable classes in the community. I also like to target youth – they seem to be the most willing to change, and they are the ones who will be leading America in the future.

  7. I completely agree. The need for Home Economics is overdue. But more than that, what is needed is a curriculums that explains the basics in buying fresh foods and cooking them in basic ways. Ideally this would be a mandatory class during elementary school, almost like art class was. It could fill in the gap that is now common as more parents have forgotten how to cook or how to enjoy the pleasures of eating and cooking.

    • Simon,

      I think a required elementary school course would be the way to go, as well. I know some high schools offer “culinary” courses but, as a professional cook myself, I can attest that these skills often have very little in common with the practical knowledge required for planning, shopping, and cooking at home.

      Thanks for sharing your insights!

      – Chef Perry

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